Using Threads to Improve Performance of Business Process

In this article we show how to call a long business process to run on a new thread.

Replace a normal call to a call in a new Thread

ENV.Common.RunOnNewThread(() =>
{
    new Demo.DemoLongProcess().Run();
},false); 

Important things to know

Context

Each thread has it's own Context, it's own connections to the database and it's own transactions. Please review the Article about Context

The OnStart of the Application Class

The on start of the application class runs for every thread - sometimes you may have a lot of logic there, you'll need to condition that logic to only run in the first time and not always.

Use Connection Pools

By default, the migrated Windows Forms application doesn't use Connection pools, since it usually uses just one connection. If you start using Threads extensively we recommend that you'll set the ENV.Data.DataProvider.ConnectionManager.UseConnectionPool to true

Monitoring the Thread progress

The RunOnNewThread method return a system.threading.thread object that you can monitor. You can use it's IsAlive property to monitor what's going on. For example

var thread = ENV.Common.RunOnNewThread(() =>
{
    new Demo.DemoLongProcess().Run();
},false);
while (thread.IsAlive)
{
    MessageBox.Show("Waiting to complete");
}
MessageBox.Show("Done"); 

You can wait for multiple Threads to be done using a simple List:

var threads = new List<Thread>();
//run thread one
threads.Add( Common.RunOnNewThread(() =>
{
    new Demo.DemoLongProcess().Run();
},false));
//run thread two
threads.Add(Common.RunOnNewThread(() =>
{
    new Demo.DemoLongProcess().Run();
}, false));
//run thread three
threads.Add(Common.RunOnNewThread(() =>
{
    new Demo.DemoLongProcess().Run();
}, false));


while (threads.Find(t=>t.IsAlive)!=null)
{
    System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox.Show("Waiting to complete");
}
System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox.Show("Done"); 


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